Exercise 3

Locating Subjects in Simple Sentences

Directions:

  1. In each of the following examples, the verb of the main clause has been colorized.

  2. Locate the subject.

  3. And type the subject word (or words) in the space provided.

  4. Be sure to check your answers when you have finished this exercise.

Hibiscus Lady
A photosilkscreen motif on a picture shirt

Example:

In the wink of an eye, shirt labels and logos became miniature works of graphic art.
Subject:

Subjects in Simple Sentences

1. The explanation for that was simple.
Subject:

2. Phrases like "Made in Hawaii" or "Made in California" conveyed a mystique about glamorous faraway places.
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3. As a consequence, a label with a picture of a palm tree and words about Paradise and Hawaii made the wearer of a shirt feel special.
Subject:

4. The image of a partially clothed swimmer standing on a surfboard or a portrait of a hula dancer wearing a grass skirt brought the Islands into the home in a personal and tangible way.
Subject:

5. In addition to the alluring appeal of wearing a shirt with a label depicting a scene from an exotic place of interest, a logo naming a clothing firm was a subtle way to advertise a product.
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6. A Hawaiian shirt casually draped over the back of a chair with its label clearly in sight was like a tiny billboard for the makers of the garment
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7. It told the onlooker where to look to find a similar kind of shirt.
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8. Thus, the name of the manufacturer was stamped on the memory by way of a soft-selling advertisement.
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9. Who could ask for anything more?
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10. From time to time, the wearers of Hawaiian shirts on the Mainland and on the Islands became walking postcards.
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11. Moreover, the selection of pattern motifs expanded from tropical fruits, surf riders, and hula dancers to include full-color reproductions of travel oriented snapshots.
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12. Some designers chose large photographic images from the Islands like the one of the Hibiscus Lady with two red blossoms pinned onto either side of her hair and yellow and red blooms clustered around the hem of her skirt.
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13. Other garment manufacturers featured architectural landmarks and sights to see in California and in other states.
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14. On a Hawaiian shirt, it was possible to find photographic renderings of the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles or cable cars from San Francisco and pink flamingos in the state of Florida.
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15. And on the Islands, a customer could buy a Hawaiian shirt with the statue of King Kamehameha on Oahu prominently displayed in multiple repeats.
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16. With a broad selection of shirts like these to choose from, why would an imaginative visitor to the Islands send an ordinary paper postcard to relatives and friends back home?
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17. Unlike a postcard, a Hawaiian shirt could be repeatedly worn, washed, and enjoyed by its owner over and over again.
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18. For the making of picture postcard shirts, it was necessary to use a photo-silkscreen process to get the chosen image embedded onto bolts of fabric.
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19. In the earlier part of this century, intricate patterns were screened by hand onto unsewn lengths of yardage one color at a time by highly skilled craftsmen.
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20. Off-color registration would have meant ruining an entire bolt of cloth and would have resulted in a considerable loss of money for a shirt designing firm.
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21. One way of mass producing Hawaiian shirts without having them look the same was to keep the pattern motifs the same while changing their colors as well as the color of the background fabric.
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22. A bunch of green bananas screened onto a red background looks different than a bunch of yellow bananas printed on mauve-colored cloth.
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23. A sportswear company produced twelve variations of one design with repeated patterns of hibiscus blossoms simply by using different color combinations to change the appearance of the finished shirt.
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24. One of the variations of the standard Hawaiian shirt is known in the industry as a border shirt.
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25. Cut longer than a regular shirt, it lends itself to having perfectly matched linear motifs like rows of anthuriums cascading down a shirt front to be designed in such a way as to hide side seams and pockets.
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